Comments

  1. The person that wrote this review pulled the old tactic of “cherry picking.” He/she wrote bits and pieces of issues in an attempt to show Darlie was railroaded, but failed to include all of the facts with those tidbits. And someone needs to tell this reviewer that it’s “Silly Sting” not “Silly Putty” how do you spray silly putty? This was written by someone that is obviously completely unfamiliar with this case that’s based their opinion of a “travesty” having occurred on one book, Not a well researched opinion.

    • I wrote the review. I stand by my belief that Darlie is innocent. You claim that I cherry picked evidence. Well, if even one piece of that cherry-picked evidence proves innocence, then that is enough. Darlie could not have committed the crime. The evidence does not implicate her, it exculpates her. The only people who can realistically look at this case and believe that she is guilty are individuals who have a connection to the people who put her there, or are unwilling to look at the evidence objectively. As for your main criticism that I wrote silly putty instead of silly string, that is not a very good argument against the facts of the case. No one cuts their own throat to commit suicide. You my friend have the same tunnel vision the detectives had. All you have to do is look at the damage to the chain she was wearing around her neck. It’s what saved her life.

      • Susan J says:

        Yes, people DO cut their own throats, and some do it with their non-dominant hand to make it look as though someone else did it.
        As for the chain, that thing wasn’t strong enough to stop a knife. Especially if the person who was weilding that knife had just stabbed two children hard enough for the knife to go in one side of their body and out the other. He’s not going to just “gently” run the knife across her throat. There was no proof that the nick in the chain was done by a knife. It could have already been there. She bought a lot of jewelry at pawn shops so it probably wasn’t in like new condition.

        • You are entitled to your opinion. I look at evidence. I don’t just go with my gut feeling. The police said that the cut on Darlie’s throat was superficial and self inflicted. The cut was not superficial. It came within centimeters of killing her. What are the chances that the nick on the chain just happened to be right where her throat was cut? What a coincidence. She had defensive wounds and bruising indicating she put up a fight. How do you explain the bloody sock? Do you really think that Darlie staged that? Search this site for Wrongful Convictions. You will see countless stories about wrongful convictions. I see the same errors over and over: detectives who try to fit the evidence to match their theory. ineffective counsel, prosecutorial misconduct. You formed an opinion because you saw a mother spraying silly string on the grave of her just deceased child. She was given the silly string by a relative. It was her son’s favorite play thing. It was close to his birthday. Your opinion clouded your ability to look at the facts.

        • JezMyOpinion says:

          Preach it sister. I’m so sick of hearing ‘the necklace was embedded in her neck and had to be surgically removed”. The damn thing fell off as soon as the bandage was removed.

  2. Susan J says:

    Darlie Routier is as guilty as sin and is right where she belongs. I have been following the case since the day it happened and nothing I have seen or read has changed my mind. At one point I had my doubts and wondered if maybe I just thought she was guilty because I didn’t like her, so I went back through and read everything I could find on the case again. I came to the same conclusion. She is guilty.

  3. jezmyopinion says:

    No need to worry about Darlie. She murdered her two sons and will eventually pay for it with her life.

  4. JezMyOpinion says:

    Graswald is just as guilty as Routier.

Trackbacks

  1. […] covered. Some of the wrongfully convicted are freed. Some are still in prison (see the story on Darlie Routier). In the case of Angelika Graswald, here is a wrongful conviction that hasn’t happened yet. […]

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